Learn about the places that defined African American Culture in Indy

Alpha Home

Opened in 1886, Alpha Home for Aged Colored Women was initially a three-room house on Darwin St. The cause was championed by Eliza Goff, a former slave who noticed the need for care facilities for elderly African Americans, particularly women.

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Bethel African American Episcopal Church

Established in 1836 as the Indianapolis Station of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Bethel A.M.E. Church is Indianapolis’ oldest African American congregation. The church building was built in 1869 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.

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Crispus Attucks Museum

The museum is located on the campus of Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School and houses memorabilia from the first all African-American high school in Indiana. The museum is open for visitation and self-guided tours Mon-Fri 9 AM to 5 PM, and Sat 12-5 PM. Guided tours are available by appointment for groups up to 50, as are Sat/Sun tours.

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Edna Martin Christian Center

The mission of the Edna Martin Christian Center is “to bridge cultural, racial, and economic differences in order to support and nurture the people in the community by providing holistic programs that empower, encourage, and engender a vision of hope.” The organization offers a number of programs and services designed to reach neighborhood residents in the areas of education, workforce development, and community health.

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Flanner House

Flanner House was established in 1898 as a settlement house for African Americans in Indianapolis. Today, Flanner House continues its mission “to support, advocate for and empower individuals, children and families by applying educational, social and economic resources that move members of the community toward stabilization, and self-sufficiency.”

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Frederick Douglass Park

Frederick Douglass Park opened in 1921 in the heart of the Martindale-Brightwood community on the east side of Indianapolis. One of the city’s most historic parks, Douglass Park is inherently linked to Indianapolis’ historic struggles with racism and discrimination. Throughout its history, the park has offered a variety of community outreach programs, including activities for youth, teens, adults, and seniors.

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Indiana Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs

The Indiana Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs was formed in 1904 by Lillian Thomas Fox. The clubhouse on North Capitol Avenue is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Clubs focused on improving education, health, living standards, and inter-racial understanding.

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Landmark for Peace Memorial

Located in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, the Landmark for Peace commemorates the events that took place in the park on the night of April 4, 1968. On his way to Indianapolis on 4.4.1968, a stop on his presidential campaign, Senator Robert F. Kennedy learned that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had been shot and killed earlier that day.

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Madame Walker Theatre Center

A National Historic Landmark, the Madam C.J. Walker Building housed the headquarters and manufacturing plant of Madam CJ Walker Hair Care and Beauty Products. Built in 1927, the building maintains most of its original architecture and is the last iconic building on Indiana Avenue, which was once the home of many black businesses, jazz clubs and churches.

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Ransom Place

Ransom Place is the oldest, most-intact African American neighborhood in Indianapolis, originally made up of around four dozen houses across six blocks. While officially established in 1897, the history of the area extends back much further, identified as a black settlement in texts since as early as the 1830s.

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